Io Che Non Vivo Senza Te – Chiara Civello ft. Gilberto Gil

Italian singer-songwriter, and pianist Chiara Civello sings “Io Che Non Vivo Senza Te”, a song introduced at the 1965 Sanremo Festival by Pino Donaggio – who’d co-written the song with Vito Pallavicini – and his team partner Jody Miller. Featuring: the Brazilian singer, guitarist, and songwriter Gilberto Gil. A beautiful duet.

The song took seventh place at Sanremo and as recorded by Donaggio reached #1 in Italy in March 1965. “Io che non vivo (senza te)” would also be prominently featured on the soundtrack of the Luchino Visconti’s 1965 film Vaghe stelle dell’Orsa (aka Sandra) starring Claudia Cardinale which was awarded the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival that September.

Here is the original Pino Donaggio version below:

English singer Dusty Springfield, who participated at the 1965 Sanremo Festival, was in the audience when Donaggio and Miller performed “Io che non vivo (senza te)” and despite having no awareness of the lyrics’ meaning the song moved Springfield to tears. Springfield obtained an acetate recording of Donaggio’s song, but allowed a year to go by before actively pursuing the idea of recording an English version.

On 9 March 1966, Springfield had an instrumental track of Donaggio’s composition recorded at Philips Studio Marble Arch: the session personnel included guitarist Big Jim Sullivan and drummer Bobby Graham. Springfield still lacked an English lyric to record: eventually Springfield’s friend Vicki Wickham, the producer of Ready Steady Go!, would write the required English lyric with her own friend Simon Napier-Bell who was the manager of the Yardbirds. Neither Wickham nor Napier-Bell had any discernible experience as songwriters: according to Napier-Bell, he and Wickham were dining out when she mentioned to him that Springfield hoped to get an English lyric for Donaggio’s song and the two light heartedly took up the challenge of writing the lyric themselves: “We went back to (Wickham)’s flat and started working on it. We wanted to go to a trendy disco so we had about an hour to write it. We wrote the chorus and then we wrote the verse in a taxi to wherever we were going.” Neither Wickham or Napier-Bell had any understanding of the Italian lyrics of the original song: according to Wickham they attempted to write their own lyric for an anti-love song to be called “I Don’t Love You”; when that original idea proved unproductive it was adjusted first to “You Don’t Love Me” and then “You Don’t Have to Love Me” which was finalized as “You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me” to fit the song’s melody. Napier-Bell was later to title his first book (an autobiographical account of the British music scene of the 1960s) You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me after the song.

And Elvis Presley version of the song:

Io Che Non Vivo Senza Te lyrics

Italian

Siamo Qui noi soli
Come ogni sera
Ma tu sei più triste
E io lo sò perchè

So che tu vuoi dirmi
Che non sei felice
Che io sto cambiando
E tu mi vuoi laciare

Io che non vivo più di un’ora senza te
Come posso stare una vita senza te
Sei mia,s ei mia, mai niente lo sai
Separarci un giorno potrai

Vieni Qui ascoltami
Che io ti voglio bene
Te ne prego fermati
Ancora insieme a me

Io che non vivo più di un’ora senza te
Come posso stare una vita senza te
Sei mia, sei mia,s ei mia

Io che non vivo più di un’ora senza te
Come posso stare una vita senza te
Sei mia, sei mia, sei mia.

English (Google translation)

Here we are just
As every evening
But you are sadder
And I know why

I know you want to tell me
That you are not happy
I’m changing
And you want me laciare

I can not live more than an hour without you
How can I spend a life without you
You are mine, and mine’s, anything you know
One day you will be able to separate us

Here Come listen
I love you
I beg stopped
Still with me

I can not live more than an hour without you
How can I spend a life without you
You’re mine, you’re mine, and my s

I can not live more than an hour without you
How can I spend a life without you
You’re mine, you’re mine, you’re mine.

You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me lyrics

When I said I needed you, you said you would always stay
It wasn’t me who changed but you, and now you’ve gone away
Don’t you see that now you’ve gone and I’m left here on my own
That I have to follow you and beg you to come home

CHORUS:
You don’t have to say you love me, just be close at hand
You don’t have to stay forever, I will understand
Believe me, believe me, I can’t help but love you
But believe me, I’ll never tie you down

Left alone with just a memory, life seems dead and so unreal
All that’s left is loneliness, there’s nothing left to feel

CHORUS:

You don’t have to say you love me, just be close at hand
You don’t have to stay forever, I will understand
Believe me, believe me….
You don’t have to say you love me, just be close at hand

You don’t have to stay forever, I will understand
Believe me, believe me, believe me

Chiara Civello (born June 15, 1975 in Rome, Italy), is a singer-songwriter, and pianist.

Originally from Rome, but now based in New York City, Chiara Civello is an eclectic, far-reaching artist who brings a variety of pop, jazz, cabaret and Latin influences to the table. Although Civello has performed straight-ahead jazz in the past, she is not a full-time jazz singer or a bebop purist by any means; stylistically, much of the material she has recorded for Verve is closer to Sade, Basia, Norah Jones, or Rickie Lee Jones, than to hardcore jazz vocalists. However, the jazz influence is almost always present in Civello’s pop recordings—and since her arrival in the United States, she has crossed paths with major jazz musicians like alto saxophonist Phil Woods and guitarist Mike Stern. Listing all of Civello’s influences could be time-consuming; Civello gives the impression that along the way, she has listened to everyone from Joni Mitchell to Billie Holiday. Brazilian jazz and pop is also a strong influence, who is obviously well aware of Brazilian greats such as Astrud Gilberto, Gal Costa, or Antonio Carlos Jobim.

Gilberto Passos Gil Moreira (born 26 June 1942), better known as Gilberto Gil is a Brazilian singer, guitarist, and songwriter, known for both his musical innovation and political commitment. From 2003 to 2008, he served as Brazil’s Minister of Culture in the administration of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. Gil’s musical style incorporates an eclectic range of influences, including Rock music, Brazilian genres including samba, African music, and reggae.

Giuseppe “Pino” Donaggio (born 24 November 1941) is an Italian composer. Born in Burano (an island of Venice), into a family of musicians, Donaggio began studying violin at the age of ten, first at the Benedetto Marcello conservatory in Venice, followed by the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory in Milan. At the age of 14, he made his solo debut in a Vivaldi concert for Italian radio, then went on to play for both the I Solisti Veneti and the Solisti di Milano. The discovery of rock and roll during the summer of 1959 ended Donaggio’s classical career when he made his singing debut with Paul Anka. He then began to write his own songs and established himself as one of Italy’s prominent singer-songwriters. He took part in the Sanremo Festival with “Come sinfonia” (1961) and had a string of successes including “Il cane di stoffa”.

However, his greatest hit was the 1965 hit “Io che non vivo”, which sold 80 million records worldwide. In 2012 he was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from the World Soundtrack Academy.

Mary Isobel Catherine Bernadette O’Brien (16 April 1939 – 2 March 1999), known professionally as Dusty Springfield, was an English pop singer and record producer whose career extended from the late 1950s to the 1990s. With her distinctive sensual sound, she was an important blue-eyed soul singer and at her peak was one of the most successful British female performers, with six top 20 singles on the United States Billboard Hot 100 and sixteen on the United Kingdom Singles Chart from 1963 to 1989. She is a member of both the US Rock and Roll and UK Music Halls of Fame. International polls have named Springfield among the best female rock artists of all time. Her image, supported by a peroxide blonde bouffant hairstyle, evening gowns, and heavy make-up, as well as her flamboyant performances on the black and white television of the 1960s, made her an icon of the Swinging Sixties.

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