“Singin’ in the Rain” (Title Song) 1952 – Gene Kelly

The title song of the 1952 American musical comedy film “Singin’ in the Rain” directed by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen, starring Kelly, Donald O’Connor and Debbie Reynolds, and choreographed by Kelly and Donen. From a recently surfaced 1080p High-Definition version of the movie. And two more song&dance performances: “Good Morning” and “Make ‘Em Laugh”. Enjoy!

“Singin’ In the Rain” is a song with lyrics by Arthur Freed and music by Nacio Herb Brown, published in 1929. It was first performed by Doris Eaton Travis in the 1929 revue The Hollywood Music Box Revue. The song became a hit and was recorded by a number of artists, notably Cliff Edwards, who also performed the number with the Brox Sisters in the early MGM musical The Hollywood Revue of 1929. B.A. Rolfe and his Lucky Strike Orchestra recorded the song possibly as early as 1928 but perhaps 1929. The song was performed by Annette Hanshaw in her album Volume 6, on film by Jimmy Durante in Speak Easily (1932), by Judy Garland in Little Nellie Kelly (1940), and as background music at the beginning of MGM’s The Divorcee (1930) starring Norma Shearer.

Singin’ in the Rain”

Written in 1929
Music by Nacio Herb Brown
Lyrics by Arthur Freed
Originally from The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (1929)
Sung by Gene Kelly as Don Lockwood

Lyrics:

Doo-dloo-doo-doo-doo
Doo-dloo-doo-doo-doo-doo
Doo-dloo-doo-doo-doo-doo
Doo-dloo-doo-doo-doo-doo…

I’m singing in the rain
Just singing in the rain
What a glorious feelin’
I’m happy again
I’m laughing at clouds
So dark up above
The sun’s in my heart
And I’m ready for love
Let the stormy clouds chase
Everyone from the place
Come on with the rain
I’ve a smile on my face
I walk down the lane
With a happy refrain
Just singin’,
Singin’ in the rain

Dancin’ in the rain
Dee-ah dee-ah dee-ah
Dee-ah dee-ah dee-ah
I’m happy again!
I’m singin’ and dancin’ in the rain!

I’m dancin’ and singin’ in the rain…

(ADDITIONAL VERSE)
Why am I smiling
And why do I sing?
Why does September
Seem sunny as spring?
Why do I get up
Each morning and start?
Happy and head up
With joy in my heart
Why is each new task
A trifle to do?
Because I am living
A life full of you.

Make ‘Em Laugh” (1948)

“Make ‘Em Laugh” is a song first featured in the 1952 film Singin’ in the Rain, frenetically performed by Donald O’Connor. Written by Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed, the song is closely based on Cole Porter’s “Be a Clown”. It finished at #49 in AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

The melody of Cole Porter’s “Be a Clown” (1948), first heard in Kelly’s film, The Pirate, was “borrowed”/sampled without permission for this song.

Music by Nacio Herb Brown
Lyrics by Arthur Freed
Sung and Danced by Donald O’Connor

Lyrics

Though the world is so full of a number things,
I know we should all be as happy as
But are we?
No, definitely no, positively no.
Decidedly no. Mm mm.
Short people have long faces and
Long people have short faces.
Big people have little humor
And little people have no humor at all!
And in the words of that immortal buddy
Samuel J. Snodgrass, as he was about to be lead
To the guillotine:

Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh
Don’t you know everyone wants to laugh?
(Ha ha!)
My dad said “Be an actor, my son
But be a comical one
They’ll be standing in lines
For those old honky tonk monkeyshines”

Now you could study Shakespeare and be quite elite
And you can charm the critics and have nothin’ to eat
Just slip on a banana peel
The world’s at your feet
Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh

Make ’em…
Make ’em laugh
Don’t you know everyone wants to laugh
My grandpa said go out and tell ’em a joke
But give it plenty of hoke

Make ’em roar
Make ’em scream
Take a fall
But a wall
Split a seam

You start off by pretending
You’re a dancer with grace
You wiggle ’till they’re
Giggling all over the place
And then you get a great big custard pie in the face
Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh

Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh
Don’t you know… all the…wants..?
My dad…
They’ll be standing in lines
For those old honky tonk monkeyshines

Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh
Don’t you know everyone wants to laugh?

Ah ha ha ha ha ha há
Ah ha ha ha ha ha
Ah ha ha ha ha ha ha
Ah ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha
Make ’em laugh, ah ah!
Make ’em laugh, ah ah!
Make ’em laugh, ah ah!

Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh
Make ’em laugh!

Good Morning

Good Morning is a song by Nacio Herb Brown (music) and Arthur Freed (lyrics) written for the 1939 film Babes in Arms and performed by Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney. In Singin’ in the Rain, it was sung by Debbie Reynolds, Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor. In 2004 the version in Singin’ in the Rain finished at #72 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of the top tunes in American cinema.

Lyrics

Good mornin’, good mornin’!
We’ve danced the whole night through,
good mornin’, good mornin’ to you.

Good mornin’, good mornin’!
It’s great to stay up late,
good mornin’, good mornin’ to you.

When the band began to play
the sun was shinin’ bright.
Now the milkman’s on his way,
it’s too late to say goodnight.

So, good mornin’, good mornin’!
Sunbeams will soon smile through,
good mornin’, my darlin’, to you.

Here we are together,
a couple of stand-uppers.
Our day is done, breakfast time
starts with our supper.

Here we are together,
ah, but the best of friends must party.
So let me sing this party song
from the bottom of my hearty.

Good morning, it’s a lovely morning.
Good morning, what a wonderful day.
We danced the whole night through.
Good morning, good morning to you.

I said good morning, see the sun is shinin’.
Good morning, hear the birdies sing.
It’s great to stay up late.
Good mornin’, good mornin’ to you.

When the band began to play
the stars were shinin’ bright.
Now the milkman’s on his way,
it’s too late to say goodnight.

Good morning, good morning!
Sunbeams will soon smile through.
Good mornin’, good morning’,
Good mornin’, my darlin’, to you!

Sources